Saturday, February 11, 2006

More Republicans Join Bandwagon Questioning Warrantless Surveillance

The list of Republicans in Congress publicly questioning whether President Bush's warantless surveillance program sidesteps of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act continues to grow.

The latest to suggest a law has been violated include Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), who told the New York Times that the more she learned about the program, the more its "gray areas" concerned her.

That makes 12 Republican Senators who have publicly questioned the program. The other 11 are: Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, who chairs the Judiciary Committee, as well as Sam Brownback of Kansas, Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, Susan Collins of Maine, Larry Craig of Idaho, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Chuck Hagel of Nebraska, Dick Lugar of Indiana, John McCain of Arizona, Olympia Snowe of Maine and John Sununu of New Hampshire.

Also distancing herself from the president is Rep. Heather Wilson (R-NM), the chairwoman of the subcommittee that oversees the National Security Agency, who earlier this week called for a full-scale Congressional investigation. Wilson was joined by Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH) in calling for an investigation.

5 Comments:

Anonymous trinity said...

David R. Mark said...
"The list of Republicans in Congress publicly questioning whether President Bush's warantless surveillance program sidesteps of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act continues to grow."


All Boehner has really said, David, is that he, himself, is not clear on the issue, and that he would welcome debate to clarify it. I'm fine with that as well. Open and honest debate is a good thing.

What I'm more concerned about right now is whether or not those responsible for leaking this very sensitive information to the NY Times are going to be held accountable for their illegal acts.

And David, since you always give a lot of weight when a member of the opposing party sides with the other one, here are some quotes from Jane Harmon, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, on NBC's "Meet the Press" this morning.

"By the way, I deplore that leak."

"This is a very valuable foreign [intelligence] collection program. I think it is tragic that a lot of our capabilities are now [spread] across the pages of the newspapers."

"If the press was part of the process of delivering classified information, there have to be some limits on press immunity,"

3:04 PM  
Anonymous Joe Snitty said...

The point is this: the Bush administration has crossed a line that many Americans, regardless of party affiliation, are deeply uncomfortable with. It's
not 'spinning' well - the excuses being made to justify it are obviously lame and hollow.

The senators mentioned above are hearing about all of this from their constituents, and are savvy enough to know that they can't just toe the party line and wait for it to quietly go away.

That about sum it up for ya?

11:24 PM  
Anonymous trinity said...

Joe Snitty said...
"The point is this: the Bush administration has crossed a line that many Americans, regardless of party affiliation, are deeply uncomfortable with."


I'm sure that's true in some cases, Snitty. My point is that, considering the inaccurate manner in which it's being reported 24/7, it's no wonder the polls aren't way off the charts in opposition to this program.

It's not 'spinning' well - the excuses being made to justify it are obviously lame and hollow.

That's your own opinion, not a fact. And if something is the truth, it's not necessary to "spin" it.

"The senators mentioned above are hearing about all of this from their constituents, and are savvy enough to know that they can't just toe the party line and wait for it to quietly go away.

That about sum it up for ya?"


I'm not sure, Snitty. As I said, from what I can see, the public opinion polls are not showing that degree of opposition to the NSA Surveillance Program, despite the fact that it's been described in a very unfair and inaccurate manner by MSM.

Imo, that goes to my belief that, with the exception of the very partisan Bush-haters out there, average Americans do not believe that the President is doing anything untoward in an effort to undermine their civil liberties. He's simply doing his damnest to protect them.

11:53 PM  
Anonymous steve said...

“the Bush administration has crossed a line that many Americans…”

There is a living and breathing group of people who DID NOT vote for Bush and wanted Kerry and another alive and kicking group that DID NOT vote for Kerry because they hated him.

THEREFORE…

It is reasonable for there to be a significant group of people who go either way on the issue. Most of the American public are not idiots.

You liberals just fucking sit there and POINT FINGERS with NO PLAN. You write this post like the media were writing about Michelle Kwan getting her “final” chance at the Gold Medal. It was going to be this inspirational story about a girl who finally did it after all of these Olympic games. The inspirational, feel good American we ALL needed, right. Uh oh she pulled a groin! What do we do now?

Just like the media, the left have no plan.

You can take your impeachment hearing bull, and stick it. It ain’t gonna happen… Mark my word.

Peace out.

1:06 AM  
Anonymous alias: "cutiepie" johnson said...

with the exception of the very partisan Bush-haters out there, average Americans do not believe that the President is doing anything untoward in an effort to undermine their civil liberties.>>

Trinity, no matter how the question is framed, it seems that about 50-55% of Americans don't agree with the idea of warrantless surveillance.

That's not a lot of "Bush-haters." People are paying close enough attention to the situation to have a reasonable opinion.

It comes down to whether you agree with the "inherent authority" argument or not. The country is pretty split. But I don't think it's reasonable to think that the percentage against Bush necessarily hates Bush. I think they just feel that he broke the existing law, and doesn't have a strong enough reason for doing so.

I think also that it surprises most Americans that, given all the hype over the Patriot Act and what civil liberties it may have affected, that warrantless surveillance wasn't part of that legislation. If you follow my argument, warrantless surveillance may be the straw that breaks many people's backs.

1:10 AM  

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